Painting in Sepia

Paintings by Rebecca Jelbert - email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Paintings by Rebecca Jelbert – email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Sepia paintings doesn’t have to be boring! If you try and mix sepia you don’t have to reach for the tube of sepia. A mixture of rich colours will give you the best results – yellows through to reds, greens and blues. Also, by placing different patches of colour next to each other, the overall effect can suggest sepia.

The paintings below have small areas of brighter colours, whilst maintaining a unifying sepia tonality. However, the emphasis shifts slightly in each picture, sometimes the the dominant colour may be a yellow-brown, sometimes a pink-brown…

Rebecca Jelbert_ChairAgainstDoor            Rebecca Jelbert_Pub_sepia

Rebecca Jelbert_Geece

I really like the appearance of old photographs, and the warmth that sepia has over black and white images. On a few occasions I have painted sepia prints, for example the following two pictures are of scenes in St. Albans where I lived at one time.

Rebecca Jelbert_St Albans_02             Rebecca Jelbert_St Albans_03

 

Sepia has been associated with the past and antique imagery but I suggest that this colour can also be used for contemporary work. Sepia allows the artist to really concentrate of the variety of tones in a picture, whilst keeping warmth through the addition of rich colours such as deep browns, blues and reds.

I also paint obstetric ultrasound images – baby scans- on canvas and have painted a few of these in single colours. Although theses black and white scans are by nature monochromatic, I have enjoyed adapting the grey scales to sepia, and a range of other colours such as blues, reds and purples.

Rebecca Jelbert_ultrasound_sepia     Rebecca_Jelbert_ultrasound_blues

 

To discuss the possibility of commissioning a painting please contact me – email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

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Painting chairs in Greece and France!

Chairs can make an interesting focal point for a painting. The following watercolours are of buildings in French and Greece. The sun not only creates strong shadows against the wall behind, but leads to the subtle bleaching of the chairs themselves.

Paintings by Rebecca Jelbert, email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Paintings by Rebecca Jelbert, email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Compositions can be created around a number of seats, as above, or around a single chair.

Rebecca_Jelbert_chair_03         Rebecca_Jelbert_painting_chair_01

 

Rebecca_Jelbert_painting_chair_02         Rebecca_Jelbert_Chairs_Greence

 

I like the way in which chairs can suggest the presence of people without the depiction of individuals, allowing the viewer to imagine themselves relaxing in the sun!

I like the subtlety of the scene below, and the way the chair almost melts into the wood behind. The wicker chairs remind me of the one next to Vincent van Gogh’s bed in his painting ‘The Bedroom at Arles.’

Rebecca Jelbert_chair_05

 

And finally a painting of some English chairs…

Watercolour paintings by Rebecca Jelbert, email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Watercolour paintings by Rebecca Jelbert, email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

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Different types of obstetric ultrasound scans – 2D, 3D, 4D

Baby scan, ultrasound or sonogram are different ways of describing the images produced by hospital scanning systems of the developing baby.

I am commissioned to paint pictures of these scans by so it’s probably worth touching on some of the options open to you.

Paintings of ultrasound scans on canvas - by Rebecca Jelbert (info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk)

Paintings of ultrasound scans on canvas – by Rebecca Jelbert (info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk)

Standard ultrasound scan – This is the traditional ultrasound examination which uses transducer over the abdomen to generate a 2D image of the developing baby. The black and white paintings above are copied from standard ultrasound pictures produced routinely at certain points through a pregnancy. These days I understand that many hospitals will charge a small fee for printing out copies of these scans.

3-D Ultrasound – Uses specially designed probes and software to generate 3-D images of the developing baby.

4-D or Dynamic 3-D Ultrasound – Uses specially designed scanners to look at the face and movements of the baby prior to delivery. The more detailed painting above (bottom right) was created from a 4D scan.

3D printing – A 3D model of the unborn child can be produced but the facilities required for these particular scans are currently not widely available.

A 12 week and 20 weeks ultrasound scan are routinely carried out during pregnancy. By 20 weeks, a lot of detail can be seen. The standard ultrasound scan will show areas within your baby’s body, whereas the 3D and 4D scans will produce more realistic images of the baby’s facial features.

Links:

http://americanpregnancy.org/prenatal-testing/ultrasound/

http://www.patient.co.uk/doctor/obstetric-ultrasound

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Details of an English street, the old and the new together

These paintings are mainly of houses in St Albans, Hampshire and Wiltshire. The buildings are generally very old, but the mix of the old and new makes the pictures more interesting. I could have chosen to completely miss out the telephone box below, or the street sign, or even the bin but I think they all add visual interest, and help to create a sense of place and time.

Paintings by Rebecca Jelbert info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Paintings by Rebecca Jelbert
info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Post boxes – free standing and inset…

Rebecca Jelbert_post box_painting_01      Rebecca Jelbert_painting_building_05

 Bikes – with both plane and detailed backgrounds showing through the spokes

Rebecca Jelbert_painting_shop_07       Rebecca Jelbert_painting_house_07

Segmented facades – original cottage and a modern house in a tudor style

Rebecca Jelbert_painting_house_06       Rebecca Jelbert_painting_thatched cottage

I now live in Bristol where, due to bomb damage in the war, old and new houses stand together in many streets. Although I don’t have examples of those pictures, here are a couple of paintings where the focus is on the modern details, the colour and style of the doors…

Rebecca Jelbert_painting_Bristol_01           Rebecca Jelbert_painting_building_3

I’ve been meaning to paint buildings with murals and graffiti on them, and living in Bristol there are some great Banksy works of art to capture, so I have no excuses. I must do that soon.

Mediterranean buildings, with their shutters, their climbing plants and brightly painted walls undoubtedly offer a wealth of opportunities for the artist but we should not forget the beauty of the English phone box, the humble post box, or the delights of a well painted garage door!

If you would like to commission a painting of your home, or of any other building, please feel free to email me: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

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Italy in watercolours – paintings by Rebecca Jelbert

Paintings of Italy by Rebecca Jelbert Email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Paintings of Italy by Rebecca Jelbert
Email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

The buildings of Italy are full of texture and colour. Crumbling plaster, fading paintwork, slatted blinds and exposed brickwork all add to the beauty of these beautiful facades.

Terracotta roof tiles are a favourite of mine, but it’s important not to put in too much detail. A few dabs and lines will go a long way towards suggesting a sea of regimented tiles.

Rebecca Jelbert_painting_Italy_02

Rebecca Jelbert_painting_Italy_01

Close ups of windows and door, a small balcony, washing hanging between windows, or even the odd street lamp, can all make a simple but effective compositions.

Rebecca Jelbert_painting_Italy_04                        Rebecca Jelbert_painting_Italy_05

Where ever you go in Italy there’s something beautiful to paint. Details of facades are a particular favourite of mine, but not just in Mediterranean countries. Next week I’ll look out some paintings of English homes, where the everyday (red phone boxes, letter boxes, and even brightly coloured garage doors) can be overlooked.

info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

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Painting food from around the world – by Rebecca Jelbert

Watercolour paintings by Rebecca Jelbert Email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Watercolour paintings by Rebecca Jelbert
Email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

I’ve always been fascinated by pattern and texture. A material background can help you to create a whole new pattern all of your own, in which folds, creases, motifs and all manner of food can add to the overall composition.

Fruit, vegetables, spices, meat, its all great to paint. I would suggest that if you’re painting meat though (or anything else that can stain, place the food on a small section of plastic to protect the material). I used scarfs for my backgrounds, but also scraps from a material shop, and interesting clothes from charity shops.

Rebecca Jelbert_still life_01

Rebecca Jelbert_still life_02

Foods and materials from India, Italy and France were my real source of inspiration in this project although there are, of course, so many cultures to choose from. As for the overall placement of the food, I tried various techniques – an overall scattering of elements, a band of food along the bottom, and sometimes a strong diagonal from one corner to the other.

Rebecca Jelbert_still life_03          Rebecca Jelbert_still life_04

Rebecca Jelbert_still life_07         Rebecca Jelbert_still life_05

As I scanned in these photographs of my watercolours, the smell of the fish and prawns actually came back to me really clearly! I painted most of these pictures one summer and because they were quite large intricate pictures, they took a while. By the time I finished, not even the cats were interested in eating the subject mater! If you want to eat the food afterwards, perhaps try painting single items on smaller sections of material.

pic02

Cooking programmes have become incredibly popular, and now you can even subscribe to watching people eat everyday on the internet! So why not food painting, with tantalising ingredients, sliced fruit, raw meat, or cooked meals….?

Watercolours by Rebecca Jelbert          Email – info@RebeccaJelebert.co.uk

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Duck paintings by Rebecca Jelbert

'Runner Ducks' by Rebecca Jelbert Email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

‘Runner Ducks’ by Rebecca Jelbert
Email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Ducks make me smile. The elongated body of the Indian Runner duck, the classic Jemima Puddle Duck shape, and even unusual head enhancements (see below!) all add to my love of this beautiful and often over looked bird.

Ducks_Rebecca Jelbert_05

Ducks_Rebecca Jelbert_03flipped

Duck_Rebecca Jelbert_04

The bright colour of a duck’s beak is a great focal point for a picture as it allows the painter to introduce an intense splash of orange or yellow in an image otherwise dominated by more muted greens or blues. The white of a duck’s body can both add to the variety of colours in a watery reflection, or can itself reflect something of the surrounding colours and tones…

Paintings by Rebecca Jelbert Email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

Paintings by Rebecca Jelbert
Email: info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

While a single duck can make an interesting study, a group of waddling birds can provide more elements with which to form a more dynamic composition, for example the birds in the watercolour above create quite a strong diagonal. This painting was created using a composite of quick sketches and photographs, their heads and tails linking one bird to the next.

Rebecca Jelbert    info@RebeccaJelbert.co.uk

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